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Mirath

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1794 large Cent
Forum: Treasures Found!
Last Post: Mirath
3 minutes ago
» Replies: 0
» Views: 1
GOLD MONSTER 1000
Forum: General Hobby Talk
Last Post: Macklin
06-22-2017, 03:51 AM
» Replies: 1
» Views: 101
1775 King George III
Forum: Treasures Found!
Last Post: SteveP (NH)
06-21-2017, 12:04 AM
» Replies: 4
» Views: 194
FORUM & SOCIETY pICNIC & ...
Forum: ANNOUNCEMENTS
Last Post: Sea Hunter
06-16-2017, 07:30 PM
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» Views: 91
Scoop On Summer Favorites
Forum: Coin Roll Hunting
Last Post: Sea Hunter
06-16-2017, 07:27 PM
» Replies: 0
» Views: 82
THANK YOU CHARLES
Forum: General Hobby Talk
Last Post: Sea Hunter
06-16-2017, 07:26 PM
» Replies: 0
» Views: 94
Each BONE is better & #24...
Forum: Bone 24
Last Post: Sea Hunter
06-12-2017, 11:00 AM
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Gold Can Still Be Found i...
Forum: General Hobby Talk
Last Post: Sea Hunter
06-12-2017, 10:14 AM
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Professional Diver Jorge
Forum: General Hobby Talk
Last Post: Sea Hunter
06-12-2017, 10:10 AM
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» Views: 87
Scoop On Summer Favorites
Forum: General Hobby Talk
Last Post: Sea Hunter
06-12-2017, 10:07 AM
» Replies: 0
» Views: 89

 
  1794 large Cent
Posted by: Mirath - 3 minutes ago - Forum: Treasures Found! - No Replies

        I was walking back to my Jimmy, after pulling up junk in an area popular for detecting, among locals, about 2 yrs ago. It's by a very old water access area, at the top of Narragansett Bay, on the Fall River MA side, of Bristol, RI. That's as close as i'll say, lol! As I was walking back, I left the detector on, but I wasn't actually looking, just walking back with my hand on the detector, an old Quick Draw, not even using the armrest. About 30' from my vehicle, on a well worn path, right in the middle of a tire track! I had a blurb. I almost kept walking, but I decided to stop and check, there was no fresh hole, so I hadn't come across it yet. I isolated the area and dropped to my knees. Pulled my small spade out and push in hard, it was packed pretty good from people goin 4 wheeling about a hundred yards up, they come in through here. The signal was strong, very strong for copper, so I was figuring some kind of plumbing or boat part, old boat parts are abundant in this area. I went in about 3", the signal indicated it was 2" down, so I wanted to come up just under it. I turned over the clump of rich loamy dirt and instantly saw what looked like a large slug, no features. I grabbed it and it seemed heavier than a regular slug. So, I poured some water over it and saw a date, 1794!!! Then other features started showing up and some stuff on the sides. I only live about 200 yards up the street, so I went home and rinsed it off better in the sink. Sure enough, a 1794 Large Cent! I just couldn't believe it!!! I mean, people are walking out of there over that spot for over 200 yrs and no one ever came across it!!! I didn't catch it when I did a sweep on the way through there my first time and I usually start prepping around there, getting things tuned up for further up where it appears there may be something, very old crumbling foundations, with 40-50 yrs and older trees all over the place, that wouldn't have been there when people were there. I was blown away. Ebay had some listed over $100k, this wasn't anywhere near that condition, but I sold it for over $200. I needed the money at the time, I wouldn't have sold it today. Not that I don't still need the money, just now that it's gone, I wish I kept it! These pics were taken about a day or so after I found it. The buildup started flaking off after it started drying. I left it alone for a few days and you could actually see less features after it all flaked off, that's when I sold it.

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  1775 King George III
Posted by: bobvt - 06-19-2017, 05:35 PM - Forum: Treasures Found! - Replies (4)

Once again, Raven got permission to detect an old property and was nice enough to invite me along yesterday.  Found a 1775 King George III, a little silver pendant, a few buttons and lots of other stuff...

   

   

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  Scoop On Summer Favorites
Posted by: Sea Hunter - 06-16-2017, 07:27 PM - Forum: Coin Roll Hunting - No Replies

Scoop On Summer Favorites

A classic summer indulgence.
Attitude determines how well you do it Scoop On Summer Favorites A classic summer indulgence. (NAPSI)-I scream, you scream, we all scream for ice cream and novelties during the summer months. As temperatures soar, there's no better time to enjoy these summer favorites. The origins of ice cream go back centuries: Alexander the Great enjoyed snow and ice, flavored with honey and nectar. Historians estimate that ice cream as we know it evolved in Europe during the 16th century, and made its first appearance in America during the early 1700s. Americans today indulge more than any other nationality in the world, averaging a whopping 45 pints of ice cream per person, per year. America's top five favorite flavors are vanilla, chocolate, Neapolitan, butter pecan and chocolate chip. The novelties industry originated in 1905 with the accidental discovery of the Popsicle: young Frank Epperson of San Francisco left a drink with a stirring stick in it on his porch during a very cold night. Today there are over 1 billion Popsicle s eaten in the U.S. every year, with orange the favorite flavor. Ice cream itself may not have been invented in America, but the Banana Split is definitely American by birth. Like no other dessert, the Banana Split is a reflection of America's creativity, imagination, passion for indulgence...and love of ice cream.

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  THANK YOU CHARLES
Posted by: Sea Hunter - 06-16-2017, 07:26 PM - Forum: General Hobby Talk - No Replies

Thank you

Charles Bass
BONE #24 Greatest
Streeters & the Professional Treasure Hunter’s Historical Society’s organized the best BONE ever.!! Thanks to Charlie Bass.
In the natural hunts, Joe Tessandori’s George Washington Inaugural button was best find and Terry Smith’s 1823 Half Dollar won find of year. Good crowd this year and most sold out. Each natural hunt had 60, 72 went to Sat Night Awards banquet & 65 attended Sunday’s $6,000 Seeded hunt. Jim Corbett won the $1,000 treasure chest. Free hot dog lunch by Chef Chris Redmond
Saturday’s Hobby Show was great as usual and well attended. Workshops were great & and Ct Todd’s was the best. Dozens of find display by area pros. Club & businesses booths Including Minelab, Garrett, Whites, Fisher, & Detector Pro. & XP Deus.. Glenn Watson, Hillsville, VA (a first Streeter customer) provided an all day Electrolysis demonstration. ICMJ gold panning contest with Craig Gifford & Frank Neal was won by Hank Walter. of Riverside, RI. Best find contest won by Terry Smith with U.S. 1823 Bust half dollar. Silent auction had a Minelab Excalibur, GO Find 40 & XTerra 505, Teknetics T-2, Garrett AT Pro, & items from Detector Pro, Ron & Gold Digger, Dennis DeWeerdt, and many others. @ Saturday night prime rib Awards Banquet 26 were inducted into BONE 24 Treasure Hunters Hall of Fame including our youngest . Julianne Karbonik……….. A Professional Treasure Hunters Historical Society membership & a Gazette subscriptions is now $50 year. Paid members are allowed to purchase a new metal detector a year @ **Streeters for up to 20% off suggested retail & able to register in advance to BONE events for up to 20% off.

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  Gold Can Still Be Found in New England!
Posted by: Sea Hunter - 06-12-2017, 10:14 AM - Forum: General Hobby Talk - No Replies

GOLD PANNING TERMS

BAR. pertains to rivers, generally a sand bar.
BLACK SAND. . . is usually magnetite, hornblende, hematite and other minerals. It is very heavy and is found with gold.
DIGGIN'S. . for weekend miners, it refers to wherever they happen to be working along the river on any particular day.
DREDGING. . . is a method of processing a great deal of material from under water. A suction hose acts much like a vacuum cleaner to pick up sand, water and gold from the river. A motor and sluice floats in mid-stream atop a large inner-tube. Operators wear wet-suits, goggles & other scuba gear.
DRY-WASHING. . . is the process used in the desert when no water is near. Gold-bearing sand is shoveled into the "hopper" at the top, then billows are worked, either by hand or by a motor, and the overburden is blown off by air-power, leaving the gold to settle in riffles. The final step of retrieving the gold is panning.
DUST. . . a term used to describe minute particles of gold.
FLOAT. . . the particles of gold that stays on the surface of the ground, usually scattered downhill from its original source......
FOOL'S GOLD. . . is mica, pyrite, or cubes of iron pyrite. All will crack and crush and, under a magnifying glass, will appear rough and grainy. Will not shine in the shade as gold does.
GLORY HOLE. . . is any crevice or low spot where you've
found a concentration of nuggets or flakes.
GROWLERS. . . are nuggets which can be heard "growling" in your pan even before you get down to seeing them.
GOLD. . . will shine in shade or sunshine. It can be of different colors. When alloyed by nature with silver, it will appear lighter in color; when alloyed with copper, it will appear darker.
HARDROCK MINING. . . is what vacation-miners call it when having to use a pick, pry-bar, gads or rock hammer to open crevices.
HI-GRADING. . . is the expression used when finding a nugget just lying on bedrock, or loose on the ground where no digging is necessary. In the old days, it meant miners were illegally removing gold from a mine where they were employed.
NUGGET. . . a lump of native gold of no special size as long as it "rattles" when you shake your gold pan.
OVERBURDEN. . . the silt, sand, and gravel that accumulates at the bottom of a river bed above bedrock and gold.
PANNING. . a method of extracting gold from stream beds.
PLACER. . . where gold is found with concentrations of sand, gravel, silt, and/or boulders.
PLINKERS. . . very small nuggets, but big enough to be picked up with tweezers.
PLUNKERS. . . nuggets that make a "plunk" sound when
dropped in your empty pan.
POCKET. . . generally means a low spot or hole or crevice in bedrock that has captured dust and nuggets.
SLUICING. . . a method of extracting gold from a river by using a series of troughs, with riffles or slats attached to the bottom to trap gold.
SNIPER. . . the name given to a person who uses a "snuffer" and snipes gold from under water crevices.
TAILINGS. . . or mine-dumps are mounds of earth left after gold-bearing ore has been removed. Tailings occur at the end of a sluice-box and must be pushed away periodically.
VEIN. . . a term referring to a lengthy occurrence of an ore.
Gold Can Still Be Found in New England!
printed in Gazette with permission from  Andy Sabisch
When someone mentions gold mining or prospecting, thoughts of California, Alaska, Georgia, or Australia usually fill ones mind; however, New England still holds enough gold to keep weekend prospectors busy for years.
While gold was found in some of Vermont's streams as early as the 1820s, it wasn't until 1855 that a true gold rush began. Matthew Kennedy, a prospector who had spent a considerable amount of time in the California gold fields, was fishing along the shore of Buffalo Brook near Plymouth. Suddenly he spied a familiar glint from something partially buried among the gravel in the stream bed. Upon picking it up, he found himself holding a beautiful gold nugget. Hundreds of fortune seekers quickly came to the Green Mountains hoping to find some of the precious yellow metal. There are reports of farmers abandoning their farms and heading for the nearby streams to try their luck at prospecting.
Unfortunately, accurate records of how much gold was actually recovered were not maintained; however, several geologists at the University of Vermont have stated that it as "considerable". Local records reveal that in the summer of 1858, one miner panned over $2,800 in gold nuggets from Buffalo Brook. Later that year, approximately $42,000 was recovered from a nearby sluicing operation. Mining activity remained strong in many areas throughout the state and in 1884, a newly opened mine in the Plymouth area reported that they had removed $78,000 worth of gold in a six-month period. The gold rush peaked in 1885 when a number of mines were started in the Raymond Hill and Freestop Hill areas north of Plymouth. All of these mines failed to turn a profit, and when they closed their doors, the boom days of gold mining began to fade into just memories.
Despite the demise of commercial gold mining activity in the state, recreational prospectors still comb the streams and rivers of New England searching for and recovering the precious yellow metal. Geological studies have shown that the best prospecting sites for gold in New England are located in Vermont. The purity of Vermont gold is also higher than that found in many other parts of the country and ranges from 96 to 98 percent pure.
Most of the gold being recovered is in the form of flour gold, flakes, and small nuggets. Large nuggets are not common; however, they have been found on a somewhat regular basis. In recent years, nuggets ranging in size from a few grains to over an ounce have been recovered from many of the streams frequented by modern day prospectors. John Hiller, the author of two books on New England prospecting, mentions that while panning on Gold Brook near Stowe recently, he saw a woman recover a 3/4 ounce nugget just upstream from where he was working.
It is important to remember that many of the gold bearing streams in New England run through private property and permission from the landowner is required before doing any prospecting. Sluicing and panning is allowed in all areas where permission has been obtained; however, the use of dredging equipment requires a permit from the state for the specific area you will be working in. An application for this permit and additional restrictions can be obtained by writing to the Forest Supervisor - Green Mountains National Forest, P.O. Box 519, Rutland, VT, 05701.
Some of the streams in which gold can still be found include the Rock River in Newfane, the West River in Townsend, the Ottauquechee River in Bridgewater, the White River in Stockbridge, the Third Branch of the White River in Braintree, the Mad River in Warren, Shady Rill Brook in Wrightsville, Minister Brook in Worchester, Little River and Gold Brook in Stowe, the Lemonille River in Johnson, the Gihon River in Eden, the Missisquoui River in Lowell, the Williams River near Ludlow, and Willie Brook in Grafton. John Hiller's books, entitled New England Placer Gold - How and Where to Pan for Gold in New England and Yankee Gold, provide additional sites along with detailed maps, as well as information on regulations and tips on finding gold..
George & Scott Streeter have been searching for (and finding) gold and other minerals in Vermont for over 15 years and they are very knowledgeable in most all aspects of prospecting including where to look and what type of equipment to use. They run Streeters Treasure Hunting Supply in Keene, NH which is the only full service prospecting shop in the VT & NH.. Streeters carries a complete line of prospecting equipment and supplies including metal detectors, gold pans, sluice boxes, dredges, digging tools, books, and topographical maps. If you are interested in trying your hand at prospecting, a visit to Streeter’s shop will be time well spent. The shop is located in center Keene beside the Keene Fire Station and additional information can be obtained by calling Streeters at (603) 357-0607. A shop in VT which sells prospecting supplies is Leisure Lines in Rutland, VT.
If you are in the New Hampshire & or Vermont area, try your hand searching for the elusive yellow metal - who knows, you might just catch a case of Gold Fever......
All material copyrighted, Info-Services 1996

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  GOLD MONSTER 1000
Posted by: Sea Hunter - 06-12-2017, 10:11 AM - Forum: General Hobby Talk - Replies (1)

Minelab’s GOLD MONSTER 1000

Universal Gold Detector
The GOLD MONSTER 1000 turns beginners into experts with fully automatic operation in an easy-to-use, high performance detector.
An 18 kHz detector will normally have a depth advantage on nuggets ≥ 1.0g over a basic mid-frequency detector, and a 71 kHz detector will have a depth advantage on nuggets ≤ 0.1g. The advanced GOLD MONSTER 1000 uses an intermediate 45 kHz frequency AND a high speed 24-bit signal processor. This primary combination greatly boosts sensitivity to gold beyond that of other single frequency VLF detectors over a wide range of nugget sizes, without introducing excess noise and false signals. Comes with a choice of coils, battery options and shaft configurations. If you're looking for super sensitive gold performance at a great price, then this is the detector you've been waiting for!
Features
  • Fully automatic operation, Extra sensitive 45 kHz VLF performance 
  • Highly adaptable, 2 search coils.

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  Professional Diver Jorge
Posted by: Sea Hunter - 06-12-2017, 10:10 AM - Forum: General Hobby Talk - No Replies

Professional Treasure Diver & Treasure Hunter Jorge Andani, new Gazette writer

I firmly believe in the mystery, I also believe that the lives of those we love and feel passion for the pursuit of treasures are, in some strange way, united. That's why, when, some time ago, this capricious fate made my friend George Streeter and I know each other, I felt we would do something together, George asked me to write something for his little treasure hunting newspaper, and of course I could not refuse.


My name is Jorge Andani,
I am a professional diver, that is my job, but if I had to define myself, I would say that I am an adventurer, a traveler and a restless soul.
I could not say exactly why, but I have always felt an enormous and strange attraction to the bottom of the sea and especially for the wrecks and all those mysteries that remain hidden and forgotten under its waters. The fact that I was born on the shores of the Mediterranean made it easy for me to start my first incursions and underwater explorations from an early age, little by little this youthful hobby became a way of life that made my way, in time, take me , Inevitably, to become a treasure hunter.
The sea is the bed of countless ships that at some point in history left the surface and began to populate the unfathomable submarine lands. Shipwrecks caused by the forces of nature, man-made accidents, tragic consequences of war ... Each sunken ship is the product of specific circumstances and keeps a unique story inside. The wrecks are vestiges of the past times, relics that sometimes reach the thousands of years of antiquity. Investigating, exploring, and unraveling these secrets has always seemed to me to be an exciting activity, surrounded largely by a certain romantic air and a strong halo of mystery.
  Thirty years ago I dug my first wreck, since then I have found and identified more than a hundred lost boats from virtually every era, and I have always done it with true passion, sometimes for work and sometimes for pure liking, but always with Respect and love of history that each and every one of these shipwrecks.
Some of my experiences:
I started my career as a professional diver in the late 1980s specializing in the naval sector, doing work all over the national territory.
Later I traveled to South America where I was part of the search and recovery expedition of the "Our Lady of Light", sunk in 1792 in Rio de La Plata, Montevideo (Uruguay), where we recovered a huge treasure composed of hundreds of Gold and silver coins, bullion and various jewels. Managed to locate several shipwrecks in the area, including the ship "Roxane", sunk in July 1945 which is said to be carrying a personal cargo of Benito Mussolini
In 1994 I traveled to Brazil where I continued my training in the commercial diving sector, doing deep diving work on the oil platform for the company Universal Services concessionaire of PETROBRAS, with Headquarters in Fortaleza (Ceará).
In 1996 I was hired by the company Aqua Maritima, based in Sao Paolo, where I participated as a specialist diver and submarine electronics operator, in three campaigns aboard the underwater exploration ship Paolo Cesar II, obtaining the location and identification of A dozen historical shipwrecks at depths between 40 and 120m. Of depth, located in the Parcel of Manoel luis, a mountain range of submarine reefs located in front of the coast of Sao Luis de Maranhao (declared natural park, and one of the most important cemeteries of ships of America).
Later I travel to Amazonas where I make a series of contacts and from there I go to the province of Minas Gerais, joining a group of gold prospectors (gold and diamond prospectors) entering the raft through the Rio das Mortes. Diving for the extraction of gold.
I traveled to Chile, where, together with an Argentine businessman, and a former submarine lawyer of the Chilean Navy, we founded the submarine exploration company Reyes Católicos S.A. , With the authorization of the National Monuments Board of Chile and as director of operations, organized and directed the search for the Spanish Patache "San Juan de Dios", sunk in 1620 on the coast of Arauco From Chile). With a shipment of 300,000 silver coins.
After that, and already working on my own, I lead a search and underwater exploration expedition on Mocha Island, 32 kilometers off the coast of Tirua (famous for the nearly 30 shipwrecks registered on its coast and have always been a base Of equipment of different corsairs and pirates) where to the Island Robinson Crusoe (Archipelago Juan Fernandez) where we realized works of exploration and location of the English Galleon "Speedwell" .logging to recover different objects and its enormous anchor.
Return to Spain, where I continue my activities in commercial diving and technical diving exploration, focusing my work on historical research and location of shipwrecks belonging to the two world conflicts and the period of the Spanish Civil War, as well as different Ancient ships of the Roman, Greek and Phoenician times, and several galleons and frigates sunk on the Mediterranean coast.
I continue to search, because after many projects carried out and hundreds of boats explored and rescued, I still think that the real reason for this passion is not in the findings, but in the search ...

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  Scoop On Summer Favorites
Posted by: Sea Hunter - 06-12-2017, 10:07 AM - Forum: General Hobby Talk - No Replies

Scoop On Summer Favorites

A classic summer indulgence.
Attitude determines how well you do it Scoop On Summer Favorites A classic summer indulgence. (NAPSI)-I scream, you scream, we all scream for ice cream and novelties during the summer months. As temperatures soar, there's no better time to enjoy these summer favorites. The origins of ice cream go back centuries: Alexander the Great enjoyed snow and ice, flavored with honey and nectar. Historians estimate that ice cream as we know it evolved in Europe during the 16th century, and made its first appearance in America during the early 1700s. Americans today indulge more than any other nationality in the world, averaging a whopping 45 pints of ice cream per person, per year. America's top five favorite flavors are vanilla, chocolate, Neapolitan, butter pecan and chocolate chip. The novelties industry originated in 1905 with the accidental discovery of the Popsicle: young Frank Epperson of San Francisco left a drink with a stirring stick in it on his porch during a very cold night. Today there are over 1 billion Popsicle s eaten in the U.S. every year, with orange the favorite flavor. Ice cream itself may not have been invented in America, but the Banana Split is definitely American by birth. Like no other dessert, the Banana Split is a reflection of America's creativity, imagination, passion for indulgence...and love of ice cream.

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  It pays to be a member
Posted by: Sea Hunter - 06-12-2017, 10:04 AM - Forum: General Hobby Talk - No Replies

joining  Incentive!

A Professional Treasure Hunters Historical Society membership & a Gazette subscriptions is now $50 year. Paid members are allowed to purchase a new metal detector a year @ **Streeters for up to 20% off suggested retail & able to register in advance to any BONE event for up to 20% off. **Must provide ID # .
Paid PTHHS members can now get up to 20% off a metal detector @ Streeters and   if pd in advance get up 20% off for BONE events. To join Send check to PTHHS, 307 Main St., Marlborough, NH 03455

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  used at Streeters & won't last long
Posted by: Sea Hunter - 06-12-2017, 10:01 AM - Forum: Tips & Tricks - No Replies

USED @ STREETERS
Minelab Explorer…… $500
White’s Spectrum …. $400
Excalibur 800……….. 1000
Fisher F-75 …………… 700
Fisher 1280-X ……….. 500
Excalibur 1000 ……… 800.

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